Workshops General Archive

  • Machine learning will define the 21st Century: from simple image classification to text generation and decision making, its impact on society will be nothing but immense. At present, the detailed mechanisms behind the power of AI still evade our understanding; growing evidence, however, suggests that it is possible to rationalise how deep learning works in terms that are very familiar to theoretical physicists, that is, the renormalisation group. The systematic, hierarchical coarsening of detailed information into increasingly simpler and more collective features is a cornerstone of modern physics, and it can be leveraged not only to make sense of machine learning’s baffling capabilities, but also and most importantly to steer its development. This workshop will explore the area where theoretical physics of soft and condensed matter and deep learning overlap, looking for novel and more powerful tools to model, investigate, and understand the world around us.
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  • Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) provide a key experimental test of Standard Model CP-violation, and a means to search for and constrain the new physics processes needed to explain our universe's observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. This motivation and impact n high-energy physics unites EDM research, which nevertheless relies on a diverse set of experimental methods and theoretical tools to fully develop its potential. This workshop is based in a European initiative to identify and strengthen connections among the groups pursuing improved measurements and calculations, as well as conceptual bridges such as phenomenology and global analysis. The major classes of experimental systems are represented (leptons, hadrons, bare nuclei, diamagnetic and paramagnetic atoms and molecules), and key theoretical topics for the interpretation of experimental results are emphasized (nuclear DFT, lattice QCD, atomic and molecular structure, chiral EFT) in addition to dedicated calculations of observables arising from specific models.
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  • In this workshop we plan to introduce the ideas of a new interdisciplinary field ‘Nuclear astrochemistry’. This brings together disparate fields of nuclear physics with the rapidly emerging field of astrochemistry to explore the processes of star formation (and death) and planet formation and how they create the conditions that may allow life to evolve and be sustained. In the workshop, the first of its kind, we will bring together leading experts in these fields together with early career researchers who will develop this new field through observations (using JWST), theoretical models and simulations and laboratory studies to address the fundamental questions of how the elements and molecules of life are created in the universe and the consequences for the search for life beyond Earth and our solar system.
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  • The nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions (HICs) starts as a far-from-equilibrium system, which eventually thermalizes into a nearly ideal liquid -- the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Experimental studies of this matter are highly non-trivial since the information is entangled in multiparticle correlations. This issue can be surpassed using hard probes (HPs) such as hadronic jets, which are successful in extracting the QGP properties. However, a real-time tomography in HIC requires a detailed understanding of the interactions throughout the entire evolution. Recently, there were multiple developments in the theory of probe-matter interactions, during the initial and intermediate stages of a HIC, and in the evolving QGP. These theoretical efforts are strongly motivated by the near future experimental programs such as the HL-LHC and sPHENIX. In this workshop, we will focus on these developments, explore their phenomenological implications, seek for new tomographic observables, and investigate how these advances can be applied to smaller systems.
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  • The workshop aims at exploring in depth the current status and upcoming prospects in the determination of the QCD coupling constant alpha_S(m_Z) from the key observables where high precision measurements and theoretical calculations are (or will be) available: lattice QCD, hadronic decays of tau leptons, deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering and global parton density analyses, QCD corrections to electroweak precision observables, and analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collisions (e+e-, ep, and pp).
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