Workshops General Archive

  • The nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions (HICs) starts as a far-from-equilibrium system, which eventually thermalizes into a nearly ideal liquid -- the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Experimental studies of this matter are highly non-trivial since the information is entangled in multiparticle correlations. This issue can be surpassed using hard probes (HPs) such as hadronic jets, which are successful in extracting the QGP properties. However, a real-time tomography in HIC requires a detailed understanding of the interactions throughout the entire evolution. Recently, there were multiple developments in the theory of probe-matter interactions, during the initial and intermediate stages of a HIC, and in the evolving QGP. These theoretical efforts are strongly motivated by the near future experimental programs such as the HL-LHC and sPHENIX. In this workshop, we will focus on these developments, explore their phenomenological implications, seek for new tomographic observables, and investigate how these advances can be applied to smaller systems.
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  • The workshop aims at exploring in depth the current status and upcoming prospects in the determination of the QCD coupling constant alpha_S(m_Z) from the key observables where high precision measurements and theoretical calculations are (or will be) available: lattice QCD, hadronic decays of tau leptons, deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering and global parton density analyses, QCD corrections to electroweak precision observables, and analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collisions (e+e-, ep, and pp).
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  • ALPACA addresses a core question in experimental and computational physics: how to get the most information from the data? In recent years, the technical availability, the friendliness of use and completeness of the resources coming from the application of increasingly sophisticated techniques in algorithms, machine learning (ML) and data analysis is allowing substantial gains in science and its applications, which were impossible to even imagine before.
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  • The proposed workshop has a broad scope embracing few-body quantum systems at the edge between stability and instability, in atomic, nuclear and hadronic physics. The main purpose is to bring people together from different communities, and focus on the interdisciplinary aspects of techniques, methods, concepts and ideas surpassing the specialization of the different subfields of physics. In spite of the difficulty to identify similarities among the approaches in several fields, the effort in this direction may be very useful. The progress in science would clearly be faster if we could ``speak the same language'' and immediately distribute the knowledge from one field to another. Collaborations crossing the subfield barriers is an efficient method to spread new insights. The aim of this series of workshops is the improvement of the flux of information and cross- fertilization between different subareas of Few-Body Physics.
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  • The workshop's scope is to advance towards a roadmap outlining the near and midterm plans for a better understanding of the physics laws governing the interaction between strange and standard nuclear matter at very low energies. Low Energy Strangeness QCD (LESQCD) is not an exact theory, and the present knowledge on this interaction is provided by chiral effective SU(3) theories, meson exchange models, and Lattice QCD calculations.
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  • This workshop aims to bring together specialists in the field as well as young practitioners to discuss in-person the latest developments on these studies. Special attention will be paid to summarize and make available to the larger community the results of the workshop discussions by publishing them in the form of proceedings or a special issue of a journal, provided that funding allows it.
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  • This workshop will provide an important opportunity to identify key experiments and new ways to advance in phenomenology and theory, in order to overcome the emerging controversies and proceed to a coherent description of hadron structure.
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  • The primary goal of MICRA is to bring together world leading experts and the next generation of scientists to foster collaborations and pave the path for new developments. The recent advancements in the field noted above set the foundation for MICRA2023. The workshop will enable connections to form to take these advances in neutrino and nuclear theory, observation, and experiment and utilize them in order to create the microphysics input needed for the researchers that are developing the most advanced computational simulations of extreme astrophysical phenomena.
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  • This program is multidisciplinary in nature, and is designed to bring together practitioners from different fields in physics with a common aim: the development of machine learning (ML) tools to solve quantum many-body problems. We are particularly interested (although not exclusively) in discussing variational neural network approaches, e.g. artificial neural network representations of quantum many-body wave functions.
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  • The ultimate goal of MIMOSA is to provide an alternative to tomography at the nanoscale with a high chemical resolution for biological and medical systems, based on Tomographic Atom Probe (TAP). MIMOSA aims to prototype a new TAP triggered by intense terahertz (THz) pulses that are stable at high repetition rates and exhibit versatile and tailored properties.
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